[jitsi-dev] Welcoming Nik


#1

Hello everyone,

I would like to introduce Nik Vaessen. Nik is a Google Summer of Code student, participating as part of the Debian Project organization. One of his projects for GSoC will be working on Jitsi (with Ingo and myself as official mentors on the Jitsi part). I will let Nik make a proper introduction of himself and his project.

Welcome, Nik!

Regards,
Boris


#2

Hi Nik, welcome aboard :slight_smile: Excited to have you on the team!

···

On May 9, 2016, at 5:03 PM, Boris Grozev <boris@jitsi.org> wrote:

Hello everyone,

I would like to introduce Nik Vaessen. Nik is a Google Summer of Code student, participating as part of the Debian Project organization. One of his projects for GSoC will be working on Jitsi (with Ingo and myself as official mentors on the Jitsi part). I will let Nik make a proper introduction of himself and his project.

Welcome, Nik!

Regards,
Boris

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#3

Nik! Great to have you!

I looked at this a while back so would be happy to chat if you want to
discuss some of these things!

Cheers,
Emil

···

On Mon, May 9, 2016 at 5:03 PM, Boris Grozev <boris@jitsi.org> wrote:

Hello everyone,

I would like to introduce Nik Vaessen. Nik is a Google Summer of Code
student, participating as part of the Debian Project organization. One of
his projects for GSoC will be working on Jitsi (with Ingo and myself as
official mentors on the Jitsi part). I will let Nik make a proper
introduction of himself and his project.

Welcome, Nik!

Regards,
Boris

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https://jitsi.org


#4

Hello everyone!

As Boris already mentioned, I'm going to work as a Google Summer of Code
student the coming months. My main project this summer is contributing to
Jitsi by implementing ICE for SIP. I am looking forward to help improve
Jitsi!

Regards,
Nik


#5

Hey Nik,

Welcome again :slight_smile:

Please feel free to us a bit more about yourself: where are you from, where do you study, what are your interests.

I know that the plan is to work on Jitsi in the second part of the summer, but I'd like us to start keep in touch from the start. Do you think you will be able to start setting up your Jitsi dev environment before coding starts?

If you have any questions for us, don't hesitate to ask -- either here on the list or privately.

Regards,
Boris

···

On 10/05/16 15:20, Nik V wrote:

Hello everyone!

As Boris already mentioned, I'm going to work as a Google Summer of Code
student the coming months. My main project this summer is contributing
to Jitsi by implementing ICE for SIP. I am looking forward to help
improve Jitsi!

Regards,
Nik

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dev mailing list
dev@jitsi.org
Unsubscribe instructions and other list options:
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#6

I live in the Netherlands, near the city Maastricht. I attend university
there, getting a bachelor degree in knowledge engineering. Most of my
courses cover topics in math, computer science and artificial intelligence.
My free time usually gets spend playing video games with my friends, or
reading a novel.

I'm in my first year of my degree. We got taught programming in Java. So I
only have about 1 year of java experience. I also have never done anything
related to networks. This is also the first time working in a, for me,
large code base. So this summer is going to involve a lot of new things.

As for setting up my dev environment, I've forked the Jitsi github
repository and imported it into my IDE. Are there any files I should get
more familiar with before I start coding this summer? Are there other
things I should read? Ingo mentioned getting to know the relevant RFC's. I
searched around and I found 3 RFC's about ICE[1], NAT[2] and TURN [3].

Regards,
Nik

[1] = https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5245 (ICE)
[2] = https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2663 (NAT)
[3] = https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5766 (TURN)

···

On Wed, May 11, 2016 at 1:02 AM, Boris Grozev <boris@jitsi.org> wrote:

Hey Nik,

Welcome again :slight_smile:

Please feel free to us a bit more about yourself: where are you from,
where do you study, what are your interests.

I know that the plan is to work on Jitsi in the second part of the summer,
but I'd like us to start keep in touch from the start. Do you think you
will be able to start setting up your Jitsi dev environment before coding
starts?

If you have any questions for us, don't hesitate to ask -- either here on
the list or privately.

Regards,
Boris

On 10/05/16 15:20, Nik V wrote:

Hello everyone!

As Boris already mentioned, I'm going to work as a Google Summer of Code
student the coming months. My main project this summer is contributing
to Jitsi by implementing ICE for SIP. I am looking forward to help
improve Jitsi!

Regards,
Nik

_______________________________________________
dev mailing list
dev@jitsi.org
Unsubscribe instructions and other list options:
http://lists.jitsi.org/mailman/listinfo/dev

_______________________________________________
dev mailing list
dev@jitsi.org
Unsubscribe instructions and other list options:
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#7

Hi,

I live in the Netherlands, near the city Maastricht. I attend university
there, getting a bachelor degree in knowledge engineering. Most of my
courses cover topics in math, computer science and artificial
intelligence. My free time usually gets spend playing video games with
my friends, or reading a novel.

I'm in my first year of my degree. We got taught programming in Java. So
I only have about 1 year of java experience. I also have never done
anything related to networks. This is also the first time working in a,
for me, large code base. So this summer is going to involve a lot of new
things.

Yes, Jitsi has a substantial code base. I'm sure there will be many new things to learn, and I think that's a good thing. I hope you too are exited about it.

As for setting up my dev environment, I've forked the Jitsi github
repository and imported it into my IDE. Are there any files I should get
more familiar with before I start coding this summer? Are there other
things I should read? Ingo mentioned getting to know the relevant RFC's.
I searched around and I found 3 RFC's about ICE[1], NAT[2] and TURN [3].

In addition to jitsi itself, you will likely need to build libjitsi and ice4j. Try to get a custom build running.

RFC5245 will be an important reference, but it may be a tough read. It has a lot of details which you won't really care about, so don't worry if you don't understand absolutely everything.

I don't think 2663 will be of any use. You'll be better off consulting something less formal (and more current) for NATs in general. Do you already know what a NAT does and why it presents a challenge for audio/video calls?

I think we can start without any TURN support, and maybe add it later.

The following article is still a good introduction to the high-level structure of Jitsi:
http://www.aosabook.org/en/jitsi.html

Regards,
Boris

···

On 11/05/16 14:57, Nik V wrote:

Regards,
Nik

[1] = https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5245 (ICE)
[2] = https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2663 (NAT)
[3] = https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5766 (TURN)

On Wed, May 11, 2016 at 1:02 AM, Boris Grozev <boris@jitsi.org > <mailto:boris@jitsi.org>> wrote:

    Hey Nik,

    Welcome again :slight_smile:

    Please feel free to us a bit more about yourself: where are you
    from, where do you study, what are your interests.

    I know that the plan is to work on Jitsi in the second part of the
    summer, but I'd like us to start keep in touch from the start. Do
    you think you will be able to start setting up your Jitsi dev
    environment before coding starts?

    If you have any questions for us, don't hesitate to ask -- either
    here on the list or privately.

    Regards,
    Boris

    On 10/05/16 15:20, Nik V wrote:

        Hello everyone!

        As Boris already mentioned, I'm going to work as a Google Summer
        of Code
        student the coming months. My main project this summer is
        contributing
        to Jitsi by implementing ICE for SIP. I am looking forward to help
        improve Jitsi!

        Regards,
        Nik

        _______________________________________________
        dev mailing list
        dev@jitsi.org <mailto:dev@jitsi.org>
        Unsubscribe instructions and other list options:
        http://lists.jitsi.org/mailman/listinfo/dev

    _______________________________________________
    dev mailing list
    dev@jitsi.org <mailto:dev@jitsi.org>
    Unsubscribe instructions and other list options:
    http://lists.jitsi.org/mailman/listinfo/dev

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#8

Yes, Jitsi has a substantial code base. I'm sure there will be many new
things to learn, and I think that's a good thing. I hope you too are exited
about it.

Yes, I'm exited about it :)!

In addition to jitsi itself, you will likely need to build libjitsi and

ice4j. Try to get a custom build running.

What do you mean with a custom build exactly?

RFC5245 will be an important reference, but it may be a tough read. It has

a lot of details which you won't really care about, so don't worry if you
don't understand absolutely everything.

The following article is still a good introduction to the high-level
structure of Jitsi:
http://www.aosabook.org/en/jitsi.html

I'll make sure to read 5245 and the article about the high-level structure,
but I'm not sure when because I also need to read for and work on Camel.

I don't think 2663 will be of any use. You'll be better off consulting
something less formal (and more current) for NATs in general. Do you
already know what a NAT does and why it presents a challenge for
audio/video calls?
I think we can start without any TURN support, and maybe add it later.

I did not know what NAT did, so I did some initial reading, mainly wikipedia
and these articles [1,2]. As far as I understand NATs currently, a NAT
functions as a single, registered ip address for multiple devices with
non-registered ip addresses in a local network. The problem with
audio/video calls is that a device inside the local network has to
initialize the call. If a device on the Internet sends a call request to
the NAT, the NAT doesn't know to which device to send the call requests and
discards it. Is this correct?

Regards,
Nik

[1] = http://computer.howstuffworks.com/nat.htm/printable
[2] = https://www.grc.com/nat/nat.htm


#9

    Yes, Jitsi has a substantial code base. I'm sure there will be many
    new things to learn, and I think that's a good thing. I hope you too
    are exited about it.

Yes, I'm exited about it :)!

    In addition to jitsi itself, you will likely need to build libjitsi
    and ice4j. Try to get a custom build running.

What do you mean with a custom build exactly?

I mean run Jitsi with your own build of ice4j and libjitsi.

    RFC5245 will be an important reference, but it may be a tough read.
    It has a lot of details which you won't really care about, so don't
    worry if you don't understand absolutely everything.

    The following article is still a good introduction to the high-level
    structure of Jitsi:
    http://www.aosabook.org/en/jitsi.html

I'll make sure to read 5245 and the article about the high-level
structure, but I'm not sure when because I also need to read for and
work on Camel.

Alright.

    I don't think 2663 will be of any use. You'll be better off
    consulting something less formal (and more current) for NATs in
    general. Do you already know what a NAT does and why it presents a
    challenge for audio/video calls?
    I think we can start without any TURN support, and maybe add it later.

I did not know what NAT did, so I did some initial reading, mainly
wikipedia and these articles [1,2]. As far as I understand NATs
currently, a NAT functions as a single, registered ip address for
multiple devices with non-registered ip addresses in a local network.
The problem with audio/video calls is that a device inside the local
network has to initialize the call. If a device on the Internet sends a
call request to the NAT, the NAT doesn't know to which device to send
the call requests and discards it. Is this correct?

Yes, that's mostly it. Clients behind a NAT can initiate a connection to a server for example, because when they send the first packet the NAT device can initialize a mapping. But they are usually not reachable for new connections from outside the NAT, because the NAT device doesn't know where to route the packets. So connecting to a server isn't a problem, but establishing a p2p between two computers behind NATs is problematic. That's where ICE comes in.

Regards,
Boris

···

On 13/05/16 09:41, Nik V wrote: