[jitsi-dev] Semi-OT: Jitsi, G.729, and the quest to find a win32 encoder, Java player


#1

I know Jitsi supports many codecs, and that VOIP uses many low-bitrate codecs.
So since I´m looking for a low-bitrate solution with Java support, I´m
asking here.. in the interest that this mesage might be indexed by
search engines and that this question (and any answers I get) might
help other people in the future.

Please, before anyone complains that this has nothing to do with
Jitsi, please read up until the end... it is slightly related

So after the introduction:

1. I´m looking for some low-bitrate codec to reduce the size of some
very long (think 4-5+ hrs of voice conversation each) person-to-person
interviews, which as Windows Media Audio (WMA), 32k bitrate, mono
encoding, end up as 50 to 60 MB .wma files. My idea is to find some
command line encoder (if possible for win32) to re-compress the files,
and then use a Java based solution (an applet would be just fine) to
reproduce these low-bitrate audio files from a web page.

2. I have found several low-bitrate codecs, namely g.729, and another
open source one dubbed "Codec2". I wasn´t able to find a command line,
win32 encoder for these... much less a java player applet solution
that I can embed on web pages.

a. Codec2, at http://www.voiptoday.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=512:codec2-low-bit-rate-open-source-speech-codec-v01-alpha-released&catid=53:general&Itemid=101
and http://freetel.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/freetel/codec2/ still
offers only "tarballs"

b. g.729: I was able to find a command-line, win32 DECODER able to
turn g.729 back to PCM wavs... http://www.voiceage.com/media/G729.zip
However, for a win32 g.729 ENCODER... all references point to a file
that was "wav2g729.rar" and was hosted at
http://www.archived-mails.info/downloads/wav2g729.rar

However, the domain "archived-mails.info" has expired and all the
content associated with it is gone. And guess what? The content was
NEVER indexed by www.archive.org

c. However, I found something about JITSI and g.729 here:
http://www.sip-communicator.org/index.php/Development/DTMF

Which states:

···

-----
DTMF with RTP and G.729

GSoC Student: Romain Philibert - France
Primary Mentor: Lubomir Marinov - Bulgaria
Project Requirements

First term:

    Develop a JMF codec for g.729
    Integrate the codec in SIP Communicator
    Implement a way that would allow users to download (via http) and
install the codec after SIP Communicator has been installed
----

I´d like to know if this was developed, if so I´m thinking of using
this codec from my own Java command-line tool to encode other file
formats (think WAV) to g.729.

Thanks for your time, and if you feel this semi-OT discussion does not
belong here, please answer privately.

Thanks in advance.

FC


#2

Hey Fernando,

На 11.07.11 23:45, Fernando Cassia написа:

I know Jitsi supports many codecs, and that VOIP uses many low-bitrate codecs.
So since I´m looking for a low-bitrate solution with Java support, I´m
asking here.. in the interest that this mesage might be indexed by
search engines and that this question (and any answers I get) might
help other people in the future.

Please, before anyone complains that this has nothing to do with
Jitsi, please read up until the end... it is slightly related

So after the introduction:

1. I´m looking for some low-bitrate codec to reduce the size of some
very long (think 4-5+ hrs of voice conversation each) person-to-person
interviews, which as Windows Media Audio (WMA), 32k bitrate, mono
encoding, end up as 50 to 60 MB .wma files. My idea is to find some
command line encoder (if possible for win32) to re-compress the files,
and then use a Java based solution (an applet would be just fine) to
reproduce these low-bitrate audio files from a web page.

2. I have found several low-bitrate codecs, namely g.729, and another
open source one dubbed "Codec2". I wasn´t able to find a command line,
win32 encoder for these... much less a java player applet solution
that I can embed on web pages.

a. Codec2, at http://www.voiptoday.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=512:codec2-low-bit-rate-open-source-speech-codec-v01-alpha-released&catid=53:general&Itemid=101
and http://freetel.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/freetel/codec2/ still
offers only "tarballs"

b. g.729: I was able to find a command-line, win32 DECODER able to
turn g.729 back to PCM wavs... http://www.voiceage.com/media/G729.zip
However, for a win32 g.729 ENCODER... all references point to a file
that was "wav2g729.rar" and was hosted at
http://www.archived-mails.info/downloads/wav2g729.rar

However, the domain "archived-mails.info" has expired and all the
content associated with it is gone. And guess what? The content was
NEVER indexed by www.archive.org

c. However, I found something about JITSI and g.729 here:
http://www.sip-communicator.org/index.php/Development/DTMF

Which states:

-----
DTMF with RTP and G.729

GSoC Student: Romain Philibert - France
Primary Mentor: Lubomir Marinov - Bulgaria
Project Requirements

First term:

    Develop a JMF codec for g.729
    Integrate the codec in SIP Communicator
    Implement a way that would allow users to download (via http) and
install the codec after SIP Communicator has been installed
----

I´d like to know if this was developed, if so I´m thinking of using
this codec from my own Java command-line tool to encode other file
formats (think WAV) to g.729.

Yes, the G.729 implementation was completed and is now part of the Jitsi
trunk. It is however disabled by default and people that have acquired
proper licensing need to recompile Jitsi in order to use it.

Cheers,
Emil


#3

Emil:

Two dumb questions for you....

1. how do you enable the G.729 code (I have licenses)?
2. how do you create the OS X app? I now have it working with 'ant run'....

Thanks.

marc.


#4

So basically G.729 cannot be used without paying, even if for
home-noncommercial use?.

And any idea where can I find a command line G.729 encoder to test the
codec´s quality?

Thanks in advance...
FC
PS: It doesn´t have to be G.729 actually, any other low-bitrate code
that gives good results and compression for voice interviews would be
of help...

···

On Mon, Jul 11, 2011 at 18:58, Emil Ivov <emcho@jitsi.org> wrote:

Yes, the G.729 implementation was completed and is now part of the Jitsi
trunk. It is however disabled by default and people that have acquired
proper licensing need to recompile Jitsi in order to use it.

Cheers,
Emil


#5

See:

XEP-0266: Codecs for Jingle Audio
http://xmpp.org/extensions/xep-0266.html

Cheers,
Andreas

···

Am 12.07.2011 07:32, schrieb Fernando Cassia:

PS: It doesn´t have to be G.729 actually, any other low-bitrate code
that gives good results and compression for voice interviews would be
of help...


#6

If you want a free voice codec with a lot of existing implementations
you should go with ilbc or GSM:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Low_Bit_Rate_Codec
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_Rate

···

On Tue, Jul 12, 2011 at 1:32 AM, Fernando Cassia <fcassia@gmail.com> wrote:

On Mon, Jul 11, 2011 at 18:58, Emil Ivov <emcho@jitsi.org> wrote:

Yes, the G.729 implementation was completed and is now part of the Jitsi
trunk. It is however disabled by default and people that have acquired
proper licensing need to recompile Jitsi in order to use it.

Cheers,
Emil

So basically G.729 cannot be used without paying, even if for
home-noncommercial use?.

And any idea where can I find a command line G.729 encoder to test the
codec´s quality?

Thanks in advance...
FC
PS: It doesn´t have to be G.729 actually, any other low-bitrate code
that gives good results and compression for voice interviews would be
of help...

--
Kristian Kielhofner