[jitsi-dev] Re: contact list from external source


#1

Hi,

Vieri could you please describe a little more the use case from the
functionality that you have mention?

Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA (1)? Or the yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact source" (2)?

1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon right next to the "search field". If I press that button, the default browser is opened and directed to a URL with whatever parameters Jitsi can pass with either GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of course the search string). So I can program the contact searching logic on the web server and display it as I wish (any format I like - images, tables, etc). The links within the contact web page I generate can interact with Jitsi if I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open chat conversations. It's really a simple hack and quite useful and flexible. On the other hand it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that elegant.

2- With this other solution, you'd have another "contact source" just like all the others already available but based on HTTP/HTTPS. That makes the output of the contact list more flexible to program from an admin's point of view and you can set it up on a rmeote server since HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The advantages of (2) over (1) is that the contact list is "integrated" within Jitsi and you can perform several actions on a given contact (not just call it but also save it to the "buddy list", etc.).

A third intermediate solution would be to add a "web viewer widget" to the Jitsi app. This solution could be even simpler to program within Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within the search field the widget can autofetch content from a custom URL. That would give the user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the widget supports executing javascript (like in Android's WebView component) then an efficient JSON client could be implemented (but that would be the admin's job, not Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page displayed within the webview could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus interact with the application. However, an even better way of interacting with Jitsi would be from the admin's javascript web app with the webview widget (see http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html - addJavascriptInterface).
If that were possible (not sure that non-Android Java web widgets can do the same) the external javascript could call Jtisi internal functions and, say, add contact details to the buddy list, etc. thus achieving the same level of functionality as in (2) but with the same layout and content freedom/flexibility as in (1).

Just giving out ideas... :wink:

cheers,

Vieri

···

--- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> wrote:


#2

It sounds like the Xivo format might be a good solution, does anyone here know how it works?

Thanks
Tom

···

On 24/01/13 18:10, Vieri wrote:

Hi,

--- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> wrote:

Vieri could you please describe a little more the use case from the
functionality that you have mention?

Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA (1)? Or the yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact source" (2)?

1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon right next to the "search field". If I press that button, the default browser is opened and directed to a URL with whatever parameters Jitsi can pass with either GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of course the search string). So I can program the contact searching logic on the web server and display it as I wish (any format I like - images, tables, etc). The links within the contact web page I generate can interact with Jitsi if I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open chat conversations. It's really a simple hack and quite useful and flexible. On the other hand it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that elegant.

2- With this other solution, you'd have another "contact source" just like all the others already available but based on HTTP/HTTPS. That makes the output of the contact list more flexible to program from an admin's point of view and you can set it up on a rmeote server since HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The advantages of (2) over (1) is that the contact list is "integrated" within Jitsi and you can perform several actions on a given contact (not just call it but also save it to the "buddy list", etc.).

A third intermediate solution would be to add a "web viewer widget" to the Jitsi app. This solution could be even simpler to program within Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within the search field the widget can autofetch content from a custom URL. That would give the user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the widget supports executing javascript (like in Android's WebView component) then an efficient JSON client could be implemented (but that would be the admin's job, not Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page displayed within the webview could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus interact with the application. However, an even better way of interacting with Jitsi would be from the admin's javascript web app with the webview widget (see http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html - addJavascriptInterface).
If that were possible (not sure that non-Android Java web widgets can do the same) the external javascript could call Jtisi internal functions and, say, add contact details to the buddy list, etc. thus achieving the same level of functionality as in (2) but with the same layout and content freedom/flexibility as in (1).

Just giving out ideas... :wink:

cheers,

Vieri


#3

Thank you very much for the detailed info Vieri! Thank you very much!

Cheers,
Anastasios Bourazanis

···

On 24/01/13 20:10, Vieri wrote:

Hi,

--- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> wrote:

Vieri could you please describe a little more the use case from the
functionality that you have mention?

Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA (1)? Or the yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact source" (2)?

1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon right next to the "search field". If I press that button, the default browser is opened and directed to a URL with whatever parameters Jitsi can pass with either GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of course the search string). So I can program the contact searching logic on the web server and display it as I wish (any format I like - images, tables, etc). The links within the contact web page I generate can interact with Jitsi if I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open chat conversations. It's really a simple hack and quite useful and flexible. On the other hand it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that elegant.

2- With this other solution, you'd have another "contact source" just like all the others already available but based on HTTP/HTTPS. That makes the output of the contact list more flexible to program from an admin's point of view and you can set it up on a rmeote server since HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The advantages of (2) over (1) is that the contact list is "integrated" within Jitsi and you can perform several actions on a given contact (not just call it but also save it to the "buddy list", etc.).

A third intermediate solution would be to add a "web viewer widget" to the Jitsi app. This solution could be even simpler to program within Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within the search field the widget can autofetch content from a custom URL. That would give the user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the widget supports executing javascript (like in Android's WebView component) then an efficient JSON client could be implemented (but that would be the admin's job, not Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page displayed within the webview could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus interact with the application. However, an even better way of interacting with Jitsi would be from the admin's javascript web app with the webview widget (see http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html - addJavascriptInterface).
If that were possible (not sure that non-Android Java web widgets can do the same) the external javascript could call Jtisi internal functions and, say, add contact details to the buddy list, etc. thus achieving the same level of functionality as in (2) but with the same layout and content freedom/flexibility as in (1).

Just giving out ideas... :wink:

cheers,

Vieri

--
/*Anastasios Bourazanis*/


#4

Has it ever been considered to add CardDAV support to Jitsi ? I can see
lots of advantages here:
- Many other clients support the protocol.
- There are relatively lightweight server packages like "Radicale"
radicale.org available that would allow an easy systemwide addressbook
on mainly linux machines. I have not tested anything yet, but it looks
interesting.
- Google supports CardDAV, so this connector could probably replace the
existing Google Contacts integration.

thanks for all the work, Mark

···

--
Sent from my Raspberry PI


#5

Has it ever been considered to add CardDAV support to Jitsi ? I can see
lots of advantages here:
- Many other clients support the protocol.
- There are relatively lightweight server packages like "Radicale"
radicale.org available that would allow an easy systemwide addressbook
on mainly linux machines. I have not tested anything yet, but it looks
interesting.
- Google supports CardDAV, so this connector could probably replace the
existing Google Contacts integration.

thanks for all the work, Mark

···

--
Sent from my Raspberry PI


#6

Hey Tom,

It seems no one has an example lying around. Maybe you could ask on the
XiVO forums? If you get something, it would be great to post it here for
future reference.

Cheers,
Emil

···

On 24.01.13, 21:07, Tom Parrott wrote:

It sounds like the Xivo format might be a good solution, does anyone
here know how it works?

Thanks
Tom
On 24/01/13 18:10, Vieri wrote:

Hi,

--- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> wrote:

Vieri could you please describe a little more the use case from the
functionality that you have mention?

Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA (1)? Or the yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact source" (2)?

1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon right next to the "search field". If I press that button, the default browser is opened and directed to a URL with whatever parameters Jitsi can pass with either GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of course the search string). So I can program the contact searching logic on the web server and display it as I wish (any format I like - images, tables, etc). The links within the contact web page I generate can interact with Jitsi if I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open chat conversations. It's really a simple hack and quite useful and flexible. On the other hand it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that elegant.

2- With this other solution, you'd have another "contact source" just like all the others already available but based on HTTP/HTTPS. That makes the output of the contact list more flexible to program from an admin's point of view and you can set it up on a rmeote server since HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The advantages of (2) over (1) is that the contact list is "integrated" within Jitsi and you can perform several actions on a given contact (not just call it but also save it to the "buddy list", etc.).

A third intermediate solution would be to add a "web viewer widget" to the Jitsi app. This solution could be even simpler to program within Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within the search field the widget can autofetch content from a custom URL. That would give the user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the widget supports executing javascript (like in Android's WebView component) then an efficient JSON client could be implemented (but that would be the admin's job, not Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page displayed within the webview could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus interact with the application. However, an even better way of interacting with Jitsi would be from the admin's javascript web app with the webview widget (see http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html - addJavascriptInterface).
If that were possible (not sure that non-Android Java web widgets can do the same) the external javascript could call Jtisi internal functions and, say, add contact details to the buddy list, etc. thus achieving the same level of functionality as in (2) but with the same layout and content freedom/flexibility as in (1).

Just giving out ideas... :wink:

cheers,

Vieri

--
https://jitsi.org


#7

Hi,

Is this it Emil?

https://wiki.xivo.fr/index.php/XiVO_1.1-Gallifrey/Documentation_XiVO_Webservices

Thanks
Ton

···

Hey Tom,

It seems no one has an example lying around. Maybe you could ask on the
XiVO forums? If you get something, it would be great to post it here for
future reference.

Cheers,
Emil

On 24.01.13, 21:07, Tom Parrott wrote:

It sounds like the Xivo format might be a good solution, does anyone
here know how it works?

Thanks
Tom
On 24/01/13 18:10, Vieri wrote:

Hi,

--- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> wrote:

Vieri could you please describe a little more the use case from the
functionality that you have mention?

Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA (1)? Or the
yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact source" (2)?

1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon right next to the "search
field". If I press that button, the default browser is opened and
directed to a URL with whatever parameters Jitsi can pass with either
GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of course the search string).
So I can program the contact searching logic on the web server and
display it as I wish (any format I like - images, tables, etc). The
links within the contact web page I generate can interact with Jitsi if
I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open chat conversations. It's
really a simple hack and quite useful and flexible. On the other hand
it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that elegant.

2- With this other solution, you'd have another "contact source" just
like all the others already available but based on HTTP/HTTPS. That
makes the output of the contact list more flexible to program from an
admin's point of view and you can set it up on a rmeote server since
HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The advantages of (2) over
(1) is that the contact list is "integrated" within Jitsi and you can
perform several actions on a given contact (not just call it but also
save it to the "buddy list", etc.).

A third intermediate solution would be to add a "web viewer widget" to
the Jitsi app. This solution could be even simpler to program within
Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within the search field the
widget can autofetch content from a custom URL. That would give the
user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the widget supports executing
javascript (like in Android's WebView component) then an efficient JSON
client could be implemented (but that would be the admin's job, not
Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page displayed within the webview
could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus interact with the application.
However, an even better way of interacting with Jitsi would be from the
admin's javascript web app with the webview widget (see
http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html -
addJavascriptInterface).
If that were possible (not sure that non-Android Java web widgets can
do the same) the external javascript could call Jtisi internal
functions and, say, add contact details to the buddy list, etc. thus
achieving the same level of functionality as in (2) but with the same
layout and content freedom/flexibility as in (1).

Just giving out ideas... :wink:

cheers,

Vieri

--
https://jitsi.org


#8

Hi,

Correct me if I'm wrong but Xivo is some sort of webmin/freepbx platform with a json webservice, right?

Most people won't use Xivo or abide to their format.
However, Jitsi would only require to be a JSON client and the admin/user should only set a few properties just like in the LDAP plugin. One would have to correlate a JSON key name with Jitsi's contact view elements (name, e-mail, tel. number, etc).
So you can implement your json webservice as you wish and use whatever key names you want (with or without Xivo).

Vieri

···

--- On Wed, 1/30/13, Tom Parrott <tomp@tomp.co.uk> wrote:

Hi,

Is this it Emil?

https://wiki.xivo.fr/index.php/XiVO_1.1-Gallifrey/Documentation_XiVO_Webservices

Thanks
Ton

> Hey Tom,
>
> It seems no one has an example lying around. Maybe you
could ask on the
> XiVO forums? If you get something, it would be great to
post it here for
> future reference.
>
> Cheers,
> Emil
>
> On 24.01.13, 21:07, Tom Parrott wrote:
>> It sounds like the Xivo format might be a good
solution, does anyone
>> here know how it works?
>>
>> Thanks
>> Tom
>> On 24/01/13 18:10, Vieri wrote:
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> --- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>>
>>>> Vieri could you please describe a little
more the use case from the
>>>> functionality that you have mention?
>>> Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA
(1)? Or the
>>> yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact
source" (2)?
>>>
>>> 1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon
right next to the "search
>>> field". If I press that button, the default
browser is opened and
>>> directed to a URL with whatever parameters
Jitsi can pass with either
>>> GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of
course the search string).
>>> So I can program the contact searching logic on
the web server and
>>> display it as I wish (any format I like -
images, tables, etc). The
>>> links within the contact web page I generate
can interact with Jitsi if
>>> I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open
chat conversations. It's
>>> really a simple hack and quite useful and
flexible. On the other hand
>>> it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that
elegant.
>>>
>>> 2- With this other solution, you'd have another
"contact source" just
>>> like all the others already available but based
on HTTP/HTTPS. That
>>> makes the output of the contact list more
flexible to program from an
>>> admin's point of view and you can set it up on
a rmeote server since
>>> HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The
advantages of (2) over
>>> (1) is that the contact list is "integrated"
within Jitsi and you can
>>> perform several actions on a given contact (not
just call it but also
>>> save it to the "buddy list", etc.).
>>>
>>> A third intermediate solution would be to add a
"web viewer widget" to
>>> the Jitsi app. This solution could be even
simpler to program within
>>> Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within
the search field the
>>> widget can autofetch content from a custom URL.
That would give the
>>> user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the
widget supports executing
>>> javascript (like in Android's WebView
component) then an efficient JSON
>>> client could be implemented (but that would be
the admin's job, not
>>> Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page
displayed within the webview
>>> could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus
interact with the application.
>>> However, an even better way of interacting with
Jitsi would be from the
>>> admin's javascript web app with the webview
widget (see
>>> http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html
-
>>> addJavascriptInterface).
>>> If that were possible (not sure that
non-Android Java web widgets can
>>> do the same) the external javascript could call
Jtisi internal
>>> functions and, say, add contact details to the
buddy list, etc. thus
>>> achieving the same level of functionality as in
(2) but with the same
>>> layout and content freedom/flexibility as in
(1).
>>>
>>> Just giving out ideas... :wink:
>>>
>>> cheers,
>>>
>>> Vieri
>>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> https://jitsi.org
>


#9

Hi Tom,

thanks for the link, it seems I have missed it while I was searching for it.
What we currently have implemented in Jitsi is an older one and I
think is based on this one:
https://wiki.xivo.fr/index.php/XiVO_1.0-Dalek/Documentation_XiVO_Daemon
It is in: net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.ServerStoredContactListXivoImpl.

Hope it helps
damencho

···

On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 4:32 PM, Tom Parrott <tomp@tomp.co.uk> wrote:

Hi,

Is this it Emil?

https://wiki.xivo.fr/index.php/XiVO_1.1-Gallifrey/Documentation_XiVO_Webservices

Thanks
Ton

Hey Tom,

It seems no one has an example lying around. Maybe you could ask on the
XiVO forums? If you get something, it would be great to post it here for
future reference.

Cheers,
Emil

On 24.01.13, 21:07, Tom Parrott wrote:

It sounds like the Xivo format might be a good solution, does anyone
here know how it works?

Thanks
Tom
On 24/01/13 18:10, Vieri wrote:

Hi,

--- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> wrote:

Vieri could you please describe a little more the use case from the
functionality that you have mention?

Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA (1)? Or the
yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact source" (2)?

1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon right next to the "search
field". If I press that button, the default browser is opened and
directed to a URL with whatever parameters Jitsi can pass with either
GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of course the search string).
So I can program the contact searching logic on the web server and
display it as I wish (any format I like - images, tables, etc). The
links within the contact web page I generate can interact with Jitsi if
I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open chat conversations. It's
really a simple hack and quite useful and flexible. On the other hand
it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that elegant.

2- With this other solution, you'd have another "contact source" just
like all the others already available but based on HTTP/HTTPS. That
makes the output of the contact list more flexible to program from an
admin's point of view and you can set it up on a rmeote server since
HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The advantages of (2) over
(1) is that the contact list is "integrated" within Jitsi and you can
perform several actions on a given contact (not just call it but also
save it to the "buddy list", etc.).

A third intermediate solution would be to add a "web viewer widget" to
the Jitsi app. This solution could be even simpler to program within
Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within the search field the
widget can autofetch content from a custom URL. That would give the
user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the widget supports executing
javascript (like in Android's WebView component) then an efficient JSON
client could be implemented (but that would be the admin's job, not
Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page displayed within the webview
could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus interact with the application.
However, an even better way of interacting with Jitsi would be from the
admin's javascript web app with the webview widget (see
http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html -
addJavascriptInterface).
If that were possible (not sure that non-Android Java web widgets can
do the same) the external javascript could call Jtisi internal
functions and, say, add contact details to the buddy list, etc. thus
achieving the same level of functionality as in (2) but with the same
layout and content freedom/flexibility as in (1).

Just giving out ideas... :wink:

cheers,

Vieri

--
https://jitsi.org


#10

Thanks. Time to brush up on my French :slight_smile:

Tom

···

Hi Tom,

thanks for the link, it seems I have missed it while I was searching for
it.
What we currently have implemented in Jitsi is an older one and I
think is based on this one:
https://wiki.xivo.fr/index.php/XiVO_1.0-Dalek/Documentation_XiVO_Daemon
It is in:
net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.ServerStoredContactListXivoImpl.

Hope it helps
damencho

On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 4:32 PM, Tom Parrott <tomp@tomp.co.uk> wrote:

Hi,

Is this it Emil?

https://wiki.xivo.fr/index.php/XiVO_1.1-Gallifrey/Documentation_XiVO_Webservices

Thanks
Ton

Hey Tom,

It seems no one has an example lying around. Maybe you could ask on the
XiVO forums? If you get something, it would be great to post it here
for
future reference.

Cheers,
Emil

On 24.01.13, 21:07, Tom Parrott wrote:

It sounds like the Xivo format might be a good solution, does anyone
here know how it works?

Thanks
Tom
On 24/01/13 18:10, Vieri wrote:

Hi,

--- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> wrote:

Vieri could you please describe a little more the use case from the
functionality that you have mention?

Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA (1)? Or the
yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact source" (2)?

1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon right next to the "search
field". If I press that button, the default browser is opened and
directed to a URL with whatever parameters Jitsi can pass with either
GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of course the search
string).
So I can program the contact searching logic on the web server and
display it as I wish (any format I like - images, tables, etc). The
links within the contact web page I generate can interact with Jitsi
if
I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open chat conversations.
It's
really a simple hack and quite useful and flexible. On the other hand
it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that elegant.

2- With this other solution, you'd have another "contact source" just
like all the others already available but based on HTTP/HTTPS. That
makes the output of the contact list more flexible to program from an
admin's point of view and you can set it up on a rmeote server since
HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The advantages of (2)
over
(1) is that the contact list is "integrated" within Jitsi and you can
perform several actions on a given contact (not just call it but also
save it to the "buddy list", etc.).

A third intermediate solution would be to add a "web viewer widget"
to
the Jitsi app. This solution could be even simpler to program within
Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within the search field the
widget can autofetch content from a custom URL. That would give the
user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the widget supports executing
javascript (like in Android's WebView component) then an efficient
JSON
client could be implemented (but that would be the admin's job, not
Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page displayed within the webview
could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus interact with the
application.
However, an even better way of interacting with Jitsi would be from
the
admin's javascript web app with the webview widget (see
http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html -
addJavascriptInterface).
If that were possible (not sure that non-Android Java web widgets can
do the same) the external javascript could call Jtisi internal
functions and, say, add contact details to the buddy list, etc. thus
achieving the same level of functionality as in (2) but with the same
layout and content freedom/flexibility as in (1).

Just giving out ideas... :wink:

cheers,

Vieri

--
https://jitsi.org


#11

Hey Vieri,

Hi,

Correct me if I'm wrong but Xivo is some sort of webmin/freepbx
platform with a json webservice, right?

Correct.

Most people won't use Xivo or abide to their format.

Indeed. Most people would use XCAP and LDAP.

However, Jitsi would only require to be a JSON client and the
admin/user should only set a few properties just like in the LDAP
plugin. One would have to correlate a JSON key name with Jitsi's
contact view elements (name, e-mail, tel. number, etc).

So you can implement your json webservice as you wish and use
whatever key names you want (with or without Xivo).

Exactly. The point is to basically allow for a simple approach to
download contacts in a SIP account. We already support the XiVO format,
so why not just use this. This shouldn't have any impact whatsoever on
the server you are using.

Cheers,
Emil

Vieri

Hi,

Is this it Emil?

https://wiki.xivo.fr/index.php/XiVO_1.1-Gallifrey/Documentation_XiVO_Webservices

Thanks

···

On 30.01.13, 17:48, Vieri wrote:

--- On Wed, 1/30/13, Tom Parrott <tomp@tomp.co.uk> wrote:

Ton

Hey Tom,

It seems no one has an example lying around. Maybe you

could ask on the

XiVO forums? If you get something, it would be great to

post it here for

future reference.

Cheers, Emil

On 24.01.13, 21:07, Tom Parrott wrote:

It sounds like the Xivo format might be a good

solution, does anyone

here know how it works?

Thanks Tom On 24/01/13 18:10, Vieri wrote:

Hi,

--- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> >> wrote:

Vieri could you please describe a little

more the use case from the

functionality that you have mention?

Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA

(1)? Or the

yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact

source" (2)?

1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon

right next to the "search

field". If I press that button, the default

browser is opened and

directed to a URL with whatever parameters

Jitsi can pass with either

GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of

course the search string).

So I can program the contact searching logic on

the web server and

display it as I wish (any format I like -

images, tables, etc). The

links within the contact web page I generate

can interact with Jitsi if

I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open

chat conversations. It's

really a simple hack and quite useful and

flexible. On the other hand

it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that

elegant.

2- With this other solution, you'd have another

"contact source" just

like all the others already available but based

on HTTP/HTTPS. That

makes the output of the contact list more

flexible to program from an

admin's point of view and you can set it up on

a rmeote server since

HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The

advantages of (2) over

(1) is that the contact list is "integrated"

within Jitsi and you can

perform several actions on a given contact (not

just call it but also

save it to the "buddy list", etc.).

A third intermediate solution would be to add a

"web viewer widget" to

the Jitsi app. This solution could be even

simpler to program within

Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within

the search field the

widget can autofetch content from a custom URL.

That would give the

user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the

widget supports executing

javascript (like in Android's WebView

component) then an efficient JSON

client could be implemented (but that would be

the admin's job, not

Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page

displayed within the webview

could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus

interact with the application.

However, an even better way of interacting with

Jitsi would be from the

admin's javascript web app with the webview

widget (see

http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html

-

addJavascriptInterface). If that were possible (not sure
that

non-Android Java web widgets can

do the same) the external javascript could call

Jtisi internal

functions and, say, add contact details to the

buddy list, etc. thus

achieving the same level of functionality as in

(2) but with the same

layout and content freedom/flexibility as in

(1).

Just giving out ideas... :wink:

cheers,

Vieri

-- https://jitsi.org

--
https://jitsi.org


#12

Hi Emil,

···

--- On Wed, 1/30/13, Emil Ivov <emcho@jitsi.org> wrote:

We already support the
XiVO format,
so why not just use this. This shouldn't have any impact
whatsoever on
the server you are using.

Now that's a nice surprise... so Jitsi can already be used as a JSON client. When I have the time I'll see if I can use it as a contact source.

Thanks

Vieri


#13

Hi,

Yeah as long as I know what format and URL params to use I am happy to
generate the server-side API to generate the correct output.

I've done it for the Yealink contacts, as well as provisioning generator
for Jitsi and Yealink.

It just means that I don't have to expose LDAP over the Internet.

Maybe I'm being paranoid, does anyone else have recommendations for using
LDAP publicly exposed?

Thanks
Tom

···

Hey Vieri,

On 30.01.13, 17:48, Vieri wrote:

Hi,

Correct me if I'm wrong but Xivo is some sort of webmin/freepbx
platform with a json webservice, right?

Correct.

Most people won't use Xivo or abide to their format.

Indeed. Most people would use XCAP and LDAP.

However, Jitsi would only require to be a JSON client and the
admin/user should only set a few properties just like in the LDAP
plugin. One would have to correlate a JSON key name with Jitsi's
contact view elements (name, e-mail, tel. number, etc).

So you can implement your json webservice as you wish and use
whatever key names you want (with or without Xivo).

Exactly. The point is to basically allow for a simple approach to
download contacts in a SIP account. We already support the XiVO format,
so why not just use this. This shouldn't have any impact whatsoever on
the server you are using.

Cheers,
Emil

Vieri

--- On Wed, 1/30/13, Tom Parrott <tomp@tomp.co.uk> wrote:

Hi,

Is this it Emil?

https://wiki.xivo.fr/index.php/XiVO_1.1-Gallifrey/Documentation_XiVO_Webservices

Thanks

Ton

Hey Tom,

It seems no one has an example lying around. Maybe you

could ask on the

XiVO forums? If you get something, it would be great to

post it here for

future reference.

Cheers, Emil

On 24.01.13, 21:07, Tom Parrott wrote:

It sounds like the Xivo format might be a good

solution, does anyone

here know how it works?

Thanks Tom On 24/01/13 18:10, Vieri wrote:

Hi,

--- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> >>> wrote:

Vieri could you please describe a little

more the use case from the

functionality that you have mention?

Which functionality? The one I posted on JIRA

(1)? Or the

yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP "contact

source" (2)?

1- With this hack Jitsi only has a new icon

right next to the "search

field". If I press that button, the default

browser is opened and

directed to a URL with whatever parameters

Jitsi can pass with either

GET or POST (username, ip addr, etc. and of

course the search string).

So I can program the contact searching logic on

the web server and

display it as I wish (any format I like -

images, tables, etc). The

links within the contact web page I generate

can interact with Jitsi if

I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make calls or open

chat conversations. It's

really a simple hack and quite useful and

flexible. On the other hand

it's not integrated in Jitsi so it's not that

elegant.

2- With this other solution, you'd have another

"contact source" just

like all the others already available but based

on HTTP/HTTPS. That

makes the output of the contact list more

flexible to program from an

admin's point of view and you can set it up on

a rmeote server since

HTTP is better for that than, say, LDAP/AD. The

advantages of (2) over

(1) is that the contact list is "integrated"

within Jitsi and you can

perform several actions on a given contact (not

just call it but also

save it to the "buddy list", etc.).

A third intermediate solution would be to add a

"web viewer widget" to

the Jitsi app. This solution could be even

simpler to program within

Jitsi. Whenever a user types something within

the search field the

widget can autofetch content from a custom URL.

That would give the

user a search-as-you-type feeling. If the

widget supports executing

javascript (like in Android's WebView

component) then an efficient JSON

client could be implemented (but that would be

the admin's job, not

Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web page

displayed within the webview

could have sip: or xmpp: links and thus

interact with the application.

However, an even better way of interacting with

Jitsi would be from the

admin's javascript web app with the webview

widget (see

http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html

-

addJavascriptInterface). If that were possible (not sure
that

non-Android Java web widgets can

do the same) the external javascript could call

Jtisi internal

functions and, say, add contact details to the

buddy list, etc. thus

achieving the same level of functionality as in

(2) but with the same

layout and content freedom/flexibility as in

(1).

Just giving out ideas... :wink:

cheers,

Vieri

-- https://jitsi.org

--
https://jitsi.org


#14

Hi,
It shouldn't be too much of an issue if you use LDAP over SSL.
Vieri

···

--- On Wed, 1/30/13, Tom Parrott <tomp@tomp.co.uk> wrote:

Hi,

Yeah as long as I know what format and URL params to use I
am happy to
generate the server-side API to generate the correct
output.

I've done it for the Yealink contacts, as well as
provisioning generator
for Jitsi and Yealink.

It just means that I don't have to expose LDAP over the
Internet.

Maybe I'm being paranoid, does anyone else have
recommendations for using
LDAP publicly exposed?

Thanks
Tom

> Hey Vieri,
>
> On 30.01.13, 17:48, Vieri wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> Correct me if I'm wrong but Xivo is some sort of
webmin/freepbx
>> platform with a json webservice, right?
>
> Correct.
>
>> Most people won't use Xivo or abide to their
format.
>
> Indeed. Most people would use XCAP and LDAP.
>
>> However, Jitsi would only require to be a JSON
client and the
>> admin/user should only set a few properties just
like in the LDAP
>> plugin. One would have to correlate a JSON key name
with Jitsi's
>> contact view elements (name, e-mail, tel. number,
etc).
>>
>> So you can implement your json webservice as you
wish and use
>> whatever key names you want (with or without
Xivo).
>
> Exactly. The point is to basically allow for a simple
approach to
> download contacts in a SIP account. We already support
the XiVO format,
> so why not just use this. This shouldn't have any
impact whatsoever on
> the server you are using.
>
> Cheers,
> Emil
>
>
>
>>
>> Vieri
>>
>>
>> --- On Wed, 1/30/13, Tom Parrott <tomp@tomp.co.uk> > wrote:
>>
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> Is this it Emil?
>>>
>>> https://wiki.xivo.fr/index.php/XiVO_1.1-Gallifrey/Documentation_XiVO_Webservices
>>>
>>>
>>>
> Thanks
>>> Ton
>>>
>>>> Hey Tom,
>>>>
>>>> It seems no one has an example lying
around. Maybe you
>>> could ask on the
>>>> XiVO forums? If you get something, it would
be great to
>>> post it here for
>>>> future reference.
>>>>
>>>> Cheers, Emil
>>>>
>>>> On 24.01.13, 21:07, Tom Parrott wrote:
>>>>> It sounds like the Xivo format might be
a good
>>> solution, does anyone
>>>>> here know how it works?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks Tom On 24/01/13 18:10, Vieri
wrote:
>>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --- On Thu, 1/24/13, a.bourazanis > <a.bourazanis@gmail.com> > >>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Vieri could you please describe
a little
>>> more the use case from the
>>>>>>> functionality that you have
mention?
>>>>>> Which functionality? The one I
posted on JIRA
>>> (1)? Or the
>>>>>> yet-to-be-implemented JSON/HTTP
"contact
>>> source" (2)?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 1- With this hack Jitsi only has a
new icon
>>> right next to the "search
>>>>>> field". If I press that button, the
default
>>> browser is opened and
>>>>>> directed to a URL with whatever
parameters
>>> Jitsi can pass with either
>>>>>> GET or POST (username, ip addr,
etc. and of
>>> course the search string).
>>>>>> So I can program the contact
searching logic on
>>> the web server and
>>>>>> display it as I wish (any format I
like -
>>> images, tables, etc). The
>>>>>> links within the contact web page I
generate
>>> can interact with Jitsi if
>>>>>> I use eg. sip: or xmpp: to make
calls or open
>>> chat conversations. It's
>>>>>> really a simple hack and quite
useful and
>>> flexible. On the other hand
>>>>>> it's not integrated in Jitsi so
it's not that
>>> elegant.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 2- With this other solution, you'd
have another
>>> "contact source" just
>>>>>> like all the others already
available but based
>>> on HTTP/HTTPS. That
>>>>>> makes the output of the contact
list more
>>> flexible to program from an
>>>>>> admin's point of view and you can
set it up on
>>> a rmeote server since
>>>>>> HTTP is better for that than, say,
LDAP/AD. The
>>> advantages of (2) over
>>>>>> (1) is that the contact list is
"integrated"
>>> within Jitsi and you can
>>>>>> perform several actions on a given
contact (not
>>> just call it but also
>>>>>> save it to the "buddy list",
etc.).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> A third intermediate solution would
be to add a
>>> "web viewer widget" to
>>>>>> the Jitsi app. This solution could
be even
>>> simpler to program within
>>>>>> Jitsi. Whenever a user types
something within
>>> the search field the
>>>>>> widget can autofetch content from a
custom URL.
>>> That would give the
>>>>>> user a search-as-you-type feeling.
If the
>>> widget supports executing
>>>>>> javascript (like in Android's
WebView
>>> component) then an efficient JSON
>>>>>> client could be implemented (but
that would be
>>> the admin's job, not
>>>>>> Jitsi's). Just like in (1) the web
page
>>> displayed within the webview
>>>>>> could have sip: or xmpp: links and
thus
>>> interact with the application.
>>>>>> However, an even better way of
interacting with
>>> Jitsi would be from the
>>>>>> admin's javascript web app with the
webview
>>> widget (see
>>>>>> http://developer.android.com/guide/webapps/webview.html
>>> -
>>>>>> addJavascriptInterface). If that
were possible (not sure
>>>>>> that
>>> non-Android Java web widgets can
>>>>>> do the same) the external
javascript could call
>>> Jtisi internal
>>>>>> functions and, say, add contact
details to the
>>> buddy list, etc. thus
>>>>>> achieving the same level of
functionality as in
>>> (2) but with the same
>>>>>> layout and content
freedom/flexibility as in
>>> (1).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Just giving out ideas... :wink:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> cheers,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Vieri
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> -- https://jitsi.org
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
> --
> https://jitsi.org
>